Salamat Dok: What should you put on your plate?

Posted at 01/30/2012 10:59 AM | Updated as of 02/03/2012 6:14 PM

A healthy balanced diet -- why does it seem so hard to follow? For many years, the Food Pyramid has been the ideal guide to nutrition but recently the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services updated its Dietary Guidelines. Now it’s called My Plate. This development was reported in Time Magazine’s The Top 10 Everything of 2011

To localize this, Salamat Dok Segment Host Sol Aragones consulted some Registered Nutritionist-Dietitians (RND) and come up with the acronym, PFVG, which stands for Protein- Fruits- Vegetables-Grains.

The idea of this healthy food plate is to divide your food into four: ¼ grains, ¼ proteins and ½ combinations of fruits and vegetables. This should be what we eat everyday to give our body its complete nutritional requirements.

Protein

Chicken, beef and pork are common sources of protein. These 3 are invariably present in every Pinoys table. Recommended size of protein source should only be the size of a deck of cards. If we will follow that, the fish on the picture should be half size only.

So that the three common proteins won’t bore you, you can swap them with other sources of protein – seafood, soy products, beans and peas, organ meats, eggs, nuts and seeds.

Fruits

Numerous studies say that there is a strong link between eating fruits and disease prevention. You can play around with commonly eaten fruits like bananas, pineapples, mangoes, oranges, melons and apples. Go for the more affordable or seasonal fruits. Nutritionist recommends 4 kinds of fruit in every meal.

Vegetables

Almost everybody knows that vegetables are not only good for cancer prevention but also in the prevention of some minor and major illnesses. Ideally, half of the plate requires a combination of 7 types of fruits and vegetables. If you already have 4 kinds of fruits, then you just need to add 3 kinds of vegetables. Here are some examples according to vegetable subgroups:

Dark Green Leafy Starchy Red & Orange Beans and Peas Others
Spinach
Bok Choy
Malunggay
Alugbati
Saluyot
Cabbage
Kangkong
Pechay
Lettce
Katuray
Kulitis
Cassava
Corn
Green Banana
Green peas
Potatoes
Plantains
Lima beans
Yam or Ube
Water chesnuts
Squash
Carrots
Red peppers
Sweet potato
Tomatoes
Black beans
Back-eyed peas
Garbanzo beans
Lentis
Soy Beans
Lentis
Soy beans
Kidney beans
Navy beans
Split peas
Bean sprout
Eggplant
Cucumbers
Green peppers
Avocado
Celery
Okra
Zucchini
Mushrooms
Green Beans
Onions

 

Grains

Grains are divided into 2 subgroups: Whole grains and refined grains. Brown rice, whole wheat pasta and oatmeal are examples of whole grains. White rice, noodles and white bread are refined grains

There goes your simple guide to eating right! Nutritionists say following the healthy plate decreases your intake of unnecessary foods. So the next time you cook, just think of the acronym – PFVG. – with reports from Pier Pastor and Adeliza Sale, Segment: Gimik with Sol Aragones, aired January 13, 2012